For Sport

Extreme sports and the over 70’s

By Emma Drew

August 22, 2011

Extreme sports and the over 70’s

The “silver sports club” is a growing trend in the UK with a large proportion of over 70’s playing competitive sport and/or being involved in extreme sports.

This is not a new phenomenon, back in 2010 Perkins Slade became involved in some press articles surrounding the interesting rise in the over 70’s and their growing extreme sports habit and injury rate.

Juxtaposed against the risk of injury that the over 70’s face when it comes to extreme sports, an interesting report conducted by the British Heart foundation (www.healthscotland.com/uploads/documents/4454-2Falls.ppt, slide 21), shows that increased Physical activity in the over 70’s will help in decreasing the amount of falls that this age bracket could have.

Improvement can be seen in:

7 sites (balance, strength, endurance and other multi-disciplinary interventions)
10% lower risk of falling

4 sites (balance training)
25% lower risk of falling

1 site (Tai Chi only – 10 moves)
47% lower risk of falling

With statistics such as those, it’s not a wonder why there are more over 70’s getting involved with sports. Certainly the over 70’s Worcester Cricket club has seen some really good press recently on BBC Cricket with their oldest member at 77 years of age.

There’s no question as to the benefits of sports for the “Silver” generation but it’s really important to ensure that you are insured when you get involved in physical activity at any age.

Perkins Slade are specialist insurance brokers who can help to insure you for the sports you play.

Have you got any interesting and exciting sports stories?

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Perkins Slade is authorised and regulated by the Financial Services Authority.

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Five reasons you can’t put off insuring your dance class

By Emma Drew

August 15, 2011

Five reasons you can’t put off insuring your dance class

Dance like any other sport can strain the body and cause injury. As a dancer, or dancing coach you have probably witnessed or experienced injury of some sort during class, rehearsal or during a performance.

 

Common injuries that can be caused by dance are:

  • Lower-Back Strain and Muscle Spasms
  • Snapping Hip Syndrome
  • Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome
  • Meniscus Knee Tear
  • Lateral Ankle Sprain

Injuries happen and, when they do, the injured party doesn’t always perceive it to be an accident which is why it is vital to have the right cover in place.

 Top 5 reasons for insuring your dance class

  1. The deeply entrenched compensation culture in the UK means that when an accident happens it won’t necessarily be perceived as such and you could be sued.
  2. If a class member causes an injury to another member during dance classes, training sessions, in rehearsal or on stage, you could be held responsible.
  3. A member of your dancing class could blame your coaching advice for injury to themselves or for an injury they’ve caused to another. If you are found negligent, you could be personally liable for damages and legal costs.
  4. It is not only in the dance studio that you are at risk; if you provide an online platform where your class members can talk, you could be at held responsible for the comments made on your web site.
  5. If you are sued all liability policies will cover your defence as well as damages; policies may offer the option to upgrade to £5 million limits.

Check your policy limits. There has been a significant rise in the amount of £2 million and above claims (which is the limit provided by most standard policies) and you could find yourself funding the difference, putting your personal assets, like your home, at risk.

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Perkins Slade is authorised and regulated by the Financial Services Authority.

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Cycling Club Insurance

By Emma Drew

August 8, 2011

Cycling Club Insurance

No one can dispute that we’ve had changeable weather over the course of July and the weather conditions have, no doubt, had a big impact on the number of crashes in the 98th Tour de France. Although, commentators on the sport believe the winding roads in the Tour’s flat stages and finishes have had the biggest impact on injury.

 

The number of injuries and deaths involving cyclists, both on and off-road, have been well documented over the years and road racing could be viewed as more dangerous than other mainstream sports as the events don’t benefit from a controlled environment, like a stadium.

Potholes, poor road surface repairs, drain covers and debris are all potential hazards during a road race and, if you add to this the fatigue of the rider, along with potential equipment malfunction, it’s easy to see how accidents happen.

Cyclists during competitions travel at amazing speeds and so, if a cyclist crashes into spectators, a number of people can be severely injured. At the annual Cottingham Cycle race earlier this year, four people, including two children, were hospitalised after a cyclist crashed into them during a road race.

It’s worth asking yourself, what might the implications of this be for the organisation that approved the route? Although it is unlikely that a club could be sued for choosing a route with winding roads (and therefore poor visibility), they could be at risk if there were any failings in protective barriers for spectators, insufficient marshaling or the failure to conduct an appropriate risk assessment for the event.

Do you have any queries on Sports Club Insurance? Join the conversation

Perkins Slade is authorised and regulated by the Financial Services Authority.

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